Ross DiMattei Biography, Age, Wife, Career, KTNV And 13 Action News

Ross DiMattei is an American journalist working as a reporter for KTNV. He was born and raised in the Boston area. He covered news at Temple University.

Ross DiMattei Biography

Ross DiMattei is an American journalist working as a reporter for KTNV. He was born and raised in the Boston area, USA.

Ross examined news coverage at Temple University in Philadelphia, graduating with his degree in 2014 while working low maintenance at the CBS news radio station, KYW 1060.

Ross comes to Las Vegas with his life partner, Tanya, and his Bernese Mountain Dog, Phil. They are incredibly eager to encounter the unending diversion and exercises that the valley brings to the table, particularly Vegas Golden Knights amusements and climbing Mt. Charleston.

Ross DiMattei Age

He was born and raised in the Boston area. Information about his age will be updated soon.

Ross DiMattei Wife

Ross comes to Las Vegas with his life partner, Tanya, and his Bernese Mountain Dog, Phil. They are very eager to encounter the interminable diversion and exercises that the valley brings to the table, particularly Vegas Golden Knights games and climbing Mt. Charleston.

Ross DiMattei

Ross DiMattei KTNV | Ross DiMattei Career | Ross DiMattei Channel 13 News | Ross DiMattei 13 Action News

Ross examined news coverage at Temple University in Philadelphia, graduating with his degree in 2014 while working low maintenance at the CBS news radio station, KYW 1060. Ross got his beginning in the T.V. news business in Elmira, N.Y., where he won Associated Press grants for his customary securing on “Great Morning Twin Tiers,” and his proceeding with the inclusion of the third and fourth Cal Harris homicide preliminaries, which stood out as truly newsworthy. Ross’ covering the preliminaries was later included on the system appears, “20/20” and “Dateline.”

Ross at that point accepting a situation as the end of the week stay/journalist at the ABC subsidiary in Fort Myers, FL, where he provided details regarding the bleeding edge of ecological debacles like Hurricane Irma and unsafe algal sprouts that unleashed destruction along the Gulf coast. He likewise detailed widely on training, including aftermath from the Parkland school shooting.

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Nellis AFB airman honored for heroism

 Article by Ross DiMattei

Las Vegas pest control companies receive an uptick in calls after earthquakes

While chandeliers were shaking and roofs were rattling, bugs were busy invading valley homes.

Las Vegas pest control companies are reporting a significant increase in insect activity over the past week following two significant earthquakes near Ridgecrest, California that could be felt in parts of the Las Vegas valley.

Ever since the earthquakes, Truly Nolen Pest Control technicians like Trent English say neighbors have been flooding his phone with pest control calls, mainly about grasshoppers and cockroaches.

“I was getting calls late at night, text messages. It got pretty busy, pretty quick, literally hundreds of grasshoppers all over the place,” says English.

But, English doesn’t believe the increase in calls is a coincidence. He believes it’s because of the two earthquakes felt throughout the valley.

“Just the timeline of the invasion of all those insects, and not just the grasshoppers, we had ants coming up. It was just a peak in an activity once that initial earthquake took place,” he says.

“With that seismic activity, I can just totally see insect populations, as the earth is shifting and moving, it’s flushing a lot of activity out into areas like Las Vegas.

If you think about it, methodically, as you break up or disturb or vibrate where those harborage points are or nesting sites for insects, obviously instinctively they are going to flee or run or evade.”

John Zuasola with Red Rock Pest Control is also experiencing a higher volume of calls, but he believes they’re more seasonal than seismic.

“The transitioning from spring to summer is usually when we’re getting a lot of calls because that’s when people are seeing bugs,” said Zuasola.

“The magnitude of the earthquake would have to be very high, where it moves the foundation of the home, where cracks and crevices form going up towards the house, where it builds a passageway or entryway for the bugs to come up.”

Instead, Zuasola blames a colder, wetter spring for the increased insect activity to start the summer.

“During the transition of spring to summer in Las Vegas, we don’t usually have a cold spring. So, now we have an influx of bugs because they were able to congregate and mate a little bit longer than usual.

13 Action News reached out to the Nevada Department of Agriculture for answers.

The state entomologist tells us it is possible for an earthquake to stir up insect activity, but in this case, he believes the earthquakes were not nearly strong enough.