Mike Flannery Biography, Age, Leaving CBS, Steve Martin | VirgiWiki Mike Flannery Biography, Age, Leaving CBS, Steve Martin

Mike Flannery Biography, Age, Leaving CBS, Steve Martin

Mike Flannery is an American Journalist who is a political reporter for Fox 32 News in Chicago, Illinois. Off from work for the longest stretch since he was a teen, Flannery, 59, has had time on his hands to tend to the plants and yard around his South Side home. It’s been a relaxing diversion, even if it hasn’t exactly distracted him from former Gov. Rod Blagojevich’s federal corruption trial, which he wishes he had been covering

Mike Flannery Biography

Mike Flannery is an American Journalist who is a political reporter for Fox 32 News in Chicago, Illinois. Off from work for the longest stretch since he was a teen, Flannery, 59, has had time on his hands to tend to the plants and yard around his South Side home. It’s been a relaxing diversion, even if it hasn’t exactly distracted him from former Gov. Rod Blagojevich’s federal corruption trial, which he wishes he had been covering

Mike Flannery Age

Flannery’s age information will be updated soon.

Mike Flannery Net Worth

Chicago TV political reporter Mike Flannery lists his house in Chicago for $1.25M; separately, the house used in Steve Martin movie “Planes, Trains & Automobiles” sells for $1.4M

Mike Flannery Leaving CBS

On the eve of his 30th‚ anniversary as political editor at WBBM-Channel 2, Mike Flannery is leaving the CBS-owned station to join WFLD-Channel 32. Starting July 1, he’ll succeed Jack Conaty, who was forced out last December after 22 years at the Fox-owned station.

In a statement to staffers Monday, Jeff Kiernan, vice president, and news director at Channel 2 wrote:‚ “I respect Mike’s decision to leave. His contributions to WBBM-TV over the last 30 years have been extensive and we wish him well.”

Flannery, 59, a native of Washington, D.C., and graduate of Georgetown University, covered politics and labor for the Chicago Sun-Times for seven years before making the transition to television in 1980.

Stay up-to-date with the latest news, stories and insider events.

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Mike Flannery Steve Martin

Flannery, a Chicago broadcast journalist who has covered politics for decades, placing his house in Chicago’s Beverly neighborhood on the market for $1,250,000. Also featured: actor Steve Martin’s house in the movie “Planes, Trains & Automobiles,” which just sold for $1,400,000. In addition, the widow of the late Northwestern University football coach Randy Walker sells a home in Wilmette, Ill, which she and her husband purchased just before his death for $1,555,000.

Mike Flannery Recreational Marijuana

Article by Mike Flannery;

Illinois lawmakers working to legalize recreational marijuana hit a snag that other states have wrestled with: whether to allow people to grow a few pot plants for personal use.

The 10 states that have legalized recreational marijuana have different “home grow” rules, with Michigan allowing individuals to grow as many as 12 plants and Washington state not allowing them to grow any.

The question in Illinois was settled Wednesday night when the Senate approved recreational use of marijuana after universal home cultivation of the plant was replaced by a provision allowing only medical-marijuana patients to grow their own.

The differences in home grow regulations reflect how states view the competing arguments about home cultivation: Opponents say it fuels the black market sale of the drug while proponents argue that if businesses can sell it, they should be able to grow it.

“We don’t say anywhere in this country that people aren’t allowed to have a small craft brew at their house if they want to, and I think the same rules should apply here,” said Kris Krane, president the Phoenix-based cannabis business 4Front Ventures.

Legalization legislation from two Chicago Democrats – state Sen. Heather Steans and state Rep. Kelly Cassidy – got off to a much better start this year than in the past because of the November election of Democratic Gov. J.B. Pritzker, who campaigned on legalizing recreational marijuana.

But pushback over policing homegrown pot forced Steans to jettison her original plan allowing cultivation for personal use before Wednesday’s Senate OK. Now, only the state’s 65,000 medical-marijuana patients would be allowed to grow at home. The measure needs House approval by Friday’s scheduled adjournment and Pritzker’s signature before Illinois would become the 11th state to allow recreational pot use.

Mike Flannery Mayor accuses Chicago police of failing to win trust in neighborhoods

Article by Mike Flannery;

He mayor says there is no cause for celebration.

But the 21 shooting victims in Chicago this past weekend are barely half the number shot on the same weekend last year, and that number is far fewer than the 58 victims gunned down — including eight dead — the same weekend in 2016.

If it’s Monday, Chicago’s top cops are at City Hall to discuss what is working and what is not as Mayor Lori Lightfoot demands police become more pro-active.

“I think they now are getting used to me and understanding that, kind of a superficial, light touch isn’t going to do it,” Lightfoot said.

The mayor once again blasted police detectives for allegedly failing to win the trust of residents in the most violent neighborhoods.

“Showing up when there’s a murder or a shooting or any other violent act and being the first time you’ve set foot in a neighborhood, without knowing any of the people, the relevant stakeholders, you’re never going to win the trust of the community that way to be able to solve crimes, because they’re not going to view you as legitimate,” Lightfoot said.

The mayor did meet over the weekend with the president of the police union, a few days after union leaders posted a new attack on what they call “her inflammatory and often false rhetoric…scapegoating the police for the chronic violence that permeates our city.”

Lightfoot said she and the union president plan to meet again.

“I’ve always thought there are things we can work collaboratively on, and I’m looking forward to that opportunity,” Lightfoot said.

City Hall’s current contract with the police union expired two years ago. But the mayor said, given how difficult negotiations are likely to be, it will probably be next year before a new one takes effect.

Mike Flannery Mayor Lightfoot Decides To Not Punish CPD Second-In-Command For Aruba Vacation

Article by Mike Flannery;

Mayor Lori Lightfoot was still upset over the weekend that Chicago’s number two cop took his family to a Caribbean island.

But she’s now decided to “move on.”

While meeting in New York with billionaire Michael Bloomberg, J.P. Morgan CEO Jamie Dimon and other financial heavyweights, Mayor Lightfoot dealt with a more prosaic concern: the family vacation taken by the Chicago Police Department’s first deputy superintendent, Anthony Riccio.

Lightfoot’s spokeswoman wrote, “The mayor spoke directly with First Deputy Riccio earlier today, making clear her expectations for all police officers going forward and emphasizing the importance for CPD’s exempt ranks to lead by example.”

The mayor has asked top cops not to take vacations this summer and was surprised by Riccio’s long-planned trip to the Caribbean. Riccio reportedly celebrated a daughter’s graduation with a six-day trip to the Caribbean. He apparently pre-paid it, before Lightfoot’s no time-off order. In the end, she decided to let it go.

“The mayor believes the issue is resolved,” her spokeswoman said, “and she continues to have full confidence in the first deputy and every member of the Chicago Police Department.”

The mayor’s two-day trip to New York includes a meeting Tuesday with Mayor Bill De Blasio and a speech to a Democratic party LGBTQ group.

Lightfoot’s trying to raise her national profile, recording an interview with Stephen Colbert to air on Thursday. She’s due to return to Chicago Tuesday.

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