Joe Berlinger Biography, Age, Wife, Paradise Lost, Ted Bundy, Crude, Instagram

 Joe Berlinger Biography

Joe Berlinger (Joseph Berlinger) is an American filmmaker, and producer. Joe particularly focuses on true crime documentaries. His films draw attention to social justice issues in the US and abroad in such films as Paradise Lost: The Child Murders at Robin Hood Hills, Crude, Whitey: United States of America v. James J. Bulger and Intent To Destroy: Death, Denial and Depiction.

Berlinger released two projects centered on the infamous serial killer Ted Bundy: the Netflix docu-series Conversations with a Killer: The Ted Bundy Tapes, and also the thriller film Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil and Vile, which he directed.

Joe Berlinger Age

Berlinger was born on October 30, 1961 in Bridgeport, Connecticut, U.S. He is 57 years old as of 2018.

Joe Berlinger Family

Joe was born in a Jewish family. He then graduated from Colgate University with a B.A in German Language.

Joe Berlinger Wife

Berlinger is married to artist Loren Eiferman and they live in Westchester County, New York.

Joe Berlinger Ted Bundy | Joe Berlinger Bundy | Joe Berlinger Netflix

Joe re-entered the world of narrative film in 2019 and directed Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil and Vile, which chronicles the life of serial killer Ted Bundy’s longtime girlfriend Liz Kloepfer. It stars Zac Efron, Lily Collins, Jim Parsons, John Malkovich, Jeffrey Donovan, Haley Joel Osment and Angela Sarafyan. It screened at the 2019 Sundance Film Festival in January 2019.

Joe Berlinger And Bruce Sinofsky

Joe took a position working at an advertising agency in Frankfurt, Germany after graduating from Colgate University. Joe soon transitioned into the world of film, where he began working as an apprentice to the iconic documentarians Albert and David Maysles. He met his future directing partner Bruce Sinofsky while they were both employed by the Maysles. Together, they would then make their directing debut with the 1992 film Brother’s Keeper.

Joe and Sinofsky created the landmark documentary Brother’s Keeper (1992) working as a directing duo, which then tells the story of Delbart Ward, an uneducated elderly man in Munnsville, New York, charged with second-degree murder after the death of his brother William. Roger Ebert a film critic called it “an extraordinary documentary about what happened next, as a town banded together to stop what folks saw as a miscarriage of justice.”

The duo went on to direct the Paradise Lost Trilogy–Paradise Lost: The Child Murders at Robin Hood Hills (1996), Paradise Lost 2: Revelations (2000), and also Paradise Lost 3: Purgatory (2011), which then earned the pair an Academy Award nomination. The trilogy which was shot over two decades, focuses on the West Memphis Three, a group of teenagers who were wrongfully convicted of the brutal murder of three children. It raised doubts about the legitimacy of the teenagers’ convictions and also spurred a movement to release them from prison, where one of the men was awaiting a death sentence. The West Memphis Three were released from their respective death and life sentences after filing an Alford Plea with the Federal Court of Arkansas in 2011.

Bruce died on February 21, 2015 at the age of 58, from diabetes-related complications. The band Metallica then paid tribute to him as a “courageous man with deep empathy and also wisdom who wasn’t afraid to dig deep to tell the story.” Joe wrote that Sinofsky’s “humanity is on every frame of the films that he leaves behind.”

Joe Berlinger Paradise Lost

Joe is best known for the film series Paradise Lost, which then documents the murder trial and also the subsequent legal battles of three Arkansas teenagers, Damien Echols, Jason Baldwin and Jessie Misskelley Jr., wrongfully convicted of murder.

The court then convicted the youths of murdering three eight-year-old boys as part of a “Ritual killing,” though no physical evidence linked the three young men to the crime.

The film documents the 20-year ordeal of these three young men from arrest to conviction, through years of unsuccessful legal efforts, to a final successful appeal which resulted in their release in the summer of 2012.

Joe Berlinger Crude

Joe’s film Crude (2009) focused on the lawsuit by Ecuadorean plaintiffs against Chevron Corporation, for its alleged responsibility for continuing sites of pollution in that country.

Joe Berlinger Whitey Bulger

Berlinger released Whitey: United States of America V. James J. Bulger in 2014 which is a documentary about the infamous Boston mob boss Whitey Bulger was released. He traces Whitey’s trail of terror as well as the FBI’s role in both enabling him and taking him down.

Joe Berlinger Film | TJoe Berlinger Documentaries

  • Book of Shadows: Blair Witch 2 (2000)
  • Brother’s Keeper (1992)
  • Bruce J. Sinofsky Memorial Reel
  • Captive Beauty (2011)
  • Crude (2009)
  • Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil and Vile
  • From the Ashes (2017)
  • Gray Matter (2004)
  • Hank: 5 Years From The Brink (2013)
  • Intent to Destroy (2017)
  • Metallica: Some Kind of Monster (2004)
  • Metallica: This Monster Lives
  • Paradise Lost 1: The Child Murders at Robin Hood Hills (1996)
  • Paradise Lost 2: Revelations (2000)
  • Paradise Lost 3: Purgatory (2011)
  • Paris to Pittsburgh
  • Pretty Old (2012)
  • Tony Robbins: I Am Not Your Guru (2016)
  • Ubah! (2015)
  • Under African Skies (2012)
  • We The Economy: The Street (2014)
  • Whitey: United States of America v. James J. Bulger (2014)

Joe Berlinger TV Shows

  • 10 Days That Unexpectedly Changed America (History Channel)
  • Addiction (HBO)
  • Black Tide: Voices From The Gulf (Animal Planet)
  • Cold Blooded: The Clutter Family Murders
  • Gone: The Forgotten Women of Ohio (Spike TV)
  • Homicide Life on the Street – Identity Crisis (NBC)
  • How Sweet the Sound (BET)
  • Iconoclasts Season 1 (Sundance Channel)
  • Iconoclasts Season 2 (Sundance Channel)
  • Iconoclasts Season 3 (Sundance Channel)
  • Iconoclasts Season 4 (Sundance Channel)
  • Iconoclasts Season 5 (Sundance Channel)
  • Iconoclasts Season 6 (Sundance Channel)
  • Judgement Day: Should the Guilty Go Free (HBO)
  • Judgment Day: Prison or Parole (Investigation Discovery)
  • Killing Richard Glossip (Investigation Discovery)
  • Master Class Season 1 (OWN)
  • Master Class Season 2 (OWN)
  • Outrageous Taxi Stories (PBS/Sundance Channel)
  • Parole Board: Victims Speak (LMN)
  • San Quentin Film School (Discovery Channel)
  • The Begging Game (PBS/Frontline)
  • The System With Joe Berlinger (Al Jazeera America)
  • Unspeakable Crime: The Killing of Jessica Chambers (Oxygen)
  • Where It’s At The Rolling Stone State of the Union (ABC)
  • Wrong Man

Joe Berlinger Emmy

Sharing with Bruce Sinofsky, Joe was nominated in 2012 for the Oscar featuring Paradise Lost 3: Purgatory (2011)

Joe Berlinger Net Worth

Berlinger’s net worth is not yet revealed.

Joe Berlinger Facebook

Joe Berlinger Twitter

Joe Berlinger Instagram

https://www.instagram.com/p/BtrPfbHj45L/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link

Joe Berlinger Wrong Man

Joe Berlinger Interview

‘The Ted Bundy Tapes’ and ‘Shockingly Evil’: Why Joe Berlinger doubled down on the serial killer

Published: FEB 07, 2019

Source:  www.latimes.com

The timing was uncanny: Days apart, on the weekend marking the 30th anniversary of the execution of notorious serial killer Ted Bundy, Academy Award-nominated filmmaker Joe Berlinger (“Paradise Lost” trilogy, “Some Kind of Monster”) premiered his Zac Efron-starring Bundy film “Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil and Vile” at the Sundance Film Festival and unveiled the four-part docuseries “The Ted Bundy Tapes” to voracious true-crime fanatics on Netflix.

“It’s a little bizarre,” Berlinger admitted, stopping by the L.A. Times studio at Sundance. “I’d love to take credit for this master plan … but the fact that I even did both is somewhat coincidental.”

It was nearly two years ago that Berlinger was contacted by author Stephen Michaud with a tantalizing offer to dive into hours and hours of taped conversations with Bundy that Michaud and Hugh Aynesworth wrote into the nonfiction book “Conversations With a Killer.”

“He said, ‘I’ve never really done anything with these audiotapes that I did a book on,” said Berlinger. “’Do you want to listen to the tapes and see if you think there’s anything there?’”

The docuseries that would become “Conversations With a Killer: The Ted Bundy Tapes” was already underway with Netflix when Michael Werwie’s Black Listed script for “Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil and Vile,” a narrative retelling of Bundy’s crimes told from the perspective of his live-in girlfriend Elizabeth “Liz” Kloepfer, fell into his lap.

Within a month and a half, the feature film secured financing with Zac Efron attached to star as the duplicitous Bundy and Lily Collins as Kloepfer, whose 1981 memoir “The Phantom Prince: My Life With Ted Bundy” shed rare insight into the private life of the convicted killer.

Now, with both Bundy projects unveiled simultaneously — Netflix announced its acquisition of “Extremely Wicked” following the film’s Sundance premiere and the trending success of its “Ted Bundy Tapes” launch — Berlinger has found himself in the controversial business of Bundy. And audiences are wrestling with their own fascination with the man who confessed to murdering and raping as many as 30 women and girls across seven states in the 1970s.

The question of the hour: Why is Joe Berlinger so obsessed with Ted Bundy — and why can’t audiences look away?

The timing of these two Ted Bundy projects makes for quite the coincidence. What sparked your interest in exploring all things Bundy?

Joe Berlinger: It’s a story that’s been told many times, so my bar was high. But I listened to the tapes and I thought there was an amazing opportunity to go inside the mind of a killer and tell a story, with a little distance and with some freshness, because we had this perspective from Bundy himself.

How did “Extremely Wicked” fall into place?
Joe Berlinger: There was no intention to do a scripted film, but I was sitting with my movie agent at CAA and I mentioned I was doing this Bundy series. He sent me the script and on the plane ride home I read it, and I texted him from 30,000 feet saying, ‘Oh my God, I love this script.’ I loved it because it provided a new way into the story, a fresh way, and it allowed me the opportunity to turn the serial-killer genre on its head. [Weeks later] at a CAA meeting Zac [Efron]’s agent says, ‘That’s interesting – Zac is looking to do something different. What do you think about Zac?’

What did you think about Zac Efron? How familiar were you with his work?
Joe Berlinger: I actually think Zac is a terrific actor who hasn’t been given enough opportunities to show his range. And I thought if Zac was willing to play with his teen heartthrob image, that’s a piece of reality to bring into the movie that I thought would be very effective. I felt like it would be a bold choice for both of us, and if it worked, it would really work.

You’ve both zeroed in this element of charisma being vital to Bundy’s ability to pull off so many crimes. That’s a quality Efron has demonstrated throughout his career, so on paper, that tracks.
Joe Berlinger: But when an agent says to you, ‘Do you want Zac to read the script?’ it’s not a light decision, because for somebody at Zac’s level to read the script it’s a reading offer. That means if he says yes, you’re obligated to use him. But my reaction was immediate. I was at JFK on South African Airlines with the doors closing. Instead of going, ‘I need to think about that and I’m going to be incommunicado for the next 36 hours because I’m on my way to the Skeleton Coast of Namibia…’ I’m having to make a quick decision: ignore the email, say yes, or think about it? I was like, ‘Sounds like a great idea. Boom.’

It’s a story that’s been told many times, so my bar was high. But I listened to the tapes and I thought there was an amazing opportunity to go inside the mind of a killer and tell a story, with a little distance and with some freshness, because we had this perspective from Bundy himself.

How did “Extremely Wicked” fall into place?

Joe Berlinger: There was no intention to do a scripted film, but I was sitting with my movie agent at CAA and I mentioned I was doing this Bundy series. He sent me the script and on the plane ride home I read it, and I texted him from 30,000 feet saying, ‘Oh my God, I love this script.’ I loved it because it provided a new way into the story, a fresh way, and it allowed me the opportunity to turn the serial-killer genre on its head. [Weeks later] at a CAA meeting Zac [Efron]’s agent says, ‘That’s interesting – Zac is looking to do something different. What do you think about Zac?’

What did you think about Zac Efron? How familiar were you with his work?

Joe Berlinger: I actually think Zac is a terrific actor who hasn’t been given enough opportunities to show his range. And I thought if Zac was willing to play with his teen heartthrob image, that’s a piece of reality to bring into the movie that I thought would be very effective. I felt like it would be a bold choice for both of us, and if it worked, it would really work.

You’ve both zeroed in this element of charisma being vital to Bundy’s ability to pull off so many crimes. That’s a quality Efron has demonstrated throughout his career, so on paper, that tracks.

Joe Berlinger: But when an agent says to you, ‘Do you want Zac to read the script?’ it’s not a light decision, because for somebody at Zac’s level to read the script it’s a reading offer. That means if he says yes, you’re obligated to use him. But my reaction was immediate. I was at JFK on South African Airlines with the doors closing. Instead of going, ‘I need to think about that and I’m going to be incommunicado for the next 36 hours because I’m on my way to the Skeleton Coast of Namibia…’ I’m having to make a quick decision: ignore the email, say yes, or think about it? I was like, ‘Sounds like a great idea. Boom.’

There are many horror fans today who will stand up for it.

Joe Berlinger: Which I appreciate. The problem was that the communication of the film got a little muddied, because at the 12th hour the studio didn’t understand what I was doing and recut the film against my will. I was making fun of the idea of doing a sequel, and I was looking to give some social commentary which has become really prescient – everybody celebrated the [original “Blair Witch Project”] marketing hoax, Time, Newsweek, every news outlet was like, “Isn’t this amazing? The studio lied to everybody and said it was a real documentary and it became a phenomenon!”

The fact that nobody in the news media took a step back to analyze, well, it’s not good that a marketing campaign was a complete lie to get people to see a movie.… And boy, have we come to be in those times where in the world of fake news and alternative facts, where news is now entertainment. When I made that film I couldn’t have imagined that things would get as bad as they are now.

How would you describe your relationship to the “true-crime” genre?

Joe Berlinger: Wikipedia calls me a true-crime pioneer. I like the “pioneer” part. The true-crime part makes me cringe a little bit because I’d like to think my explorations of true crime in my documentary work have a layer of social justice. But there’s plenty of true crime out there that just wallows in the misery of others.

And much of our fascination with true crime is a seeking of understanding of the horrific things people do to each other

Joe Berlinger: Right, and that’s why I scratch my head where people can look at [“Extremely Wicked”] and say that we’re glorifying [Bundy]. It’s a very serious film. Because Bundy defied all stereotypes of what a serial killer was. And that’s why a film that portrays not killing but the seduction of the serial killer which allowed him to elude capture for so long — while also making a commentary about the nature of our obsession with true crime — to me is the opposite of glorification. It’s a very highly aware, self-critical exploration of these phenomena.

While working on both Bundy projects, were you in dialogue with the families of his victims – and did that factor into how you handled the material?

Joe Berlinger: Not really, to be honest with you. But it did. I feel a great sense of responsibility when I’m telling a victim’s story. In fact, the lesson I learned was on “Paradise Lost.” When we went to make the original “Paradise Lost” we showed up a week after the arrest and the entire world thought that these guys were guilty … when we went down to Arkansas a week after the arrest and embedded in the community for seven months before the trial started, we thought we were making a film about kids killing kids.

We spent time with the families of the victims, we convinced them to give us access to their story, because we felt at the time this was an important thing for other parents to learn about. That was our pitch to them and it was very sincere and authentic. But over time we became convinced that the kids were innocent. And by the time we left the trial, we were utterly convinced that the West Memphis Three had just been convicted for crimes they weren’t guilty of.

So when the movies came out the families were horrified, and hated us, which I understand. Because there’s no closure when you’ve lost a child to violence, or lost a child, period, but the healing process is predicated on the serving of justice. Eventually two of the three families came over to our point of view and thanked us for our work and said, basically, that they would never want the wrong people to be wrongfully convicted.

One family to this day believes the West Memphis Three are guilty and that we did a terrible disservice.… All of that is extremely painful. The last thing I want to do is to make victims feel worse, and I think the rest of my track record demonstrates my commitment to victims. And I have nothing but sympathy toward the family who hates me because I could never imagine being in their shoes. But the lesson I learned from that is you need to be extremely sensitive to the victim’s families.

In this instance, when we started reaching out to [Bundy’s victims’ families] they felt like the story has been so oft-told, that the intrusion of more people reaching out to them was actually what was painful. So I decided to stop reaching out seeking cooperation from family members and instead decided to make sure that nothing about the Bundy tapes had new information about what happened to their children.

What sort of information did you purposefully leave out of the docuseries?

Joe Berlinger: A handful of new information that we decided not to use because it would be new to the public and that wouldn’t be fair. But with regard to survivors, we reached out to Carol DaRonch, the Utah woman who survived and escaped and was able to ID him and start the legal proceedings, who was very reluctant but eventually agreed to participate. And of course for the movie, it was very important to see Elizabeth Kloepfer.

As a documentarian who has wrestled with these ethical issues, what’s your take on the controversy surrounding the Michael Jackson documentary here at Sundance?

Joe Berlinger: I’m not commenting specifically about this filmmaker or film because I haven’t seen it, but I always strive to have all sides included in a film. I think at the end of the day in all films, whether it’s a documentary or not, you make a thousand subjective decisions. Often, you’re not going for the literal truth of a situation, you’re going for the emotional truth.… You trust a filmmaker to condense and give you the emotional truth of a situation. And I think sometimes people are afraid of showing all sides, but showing all sides doesn’t mean you don’t have a point of view or an opinion. So I would hope that this film represents the emotional truth of what went down.

With so much Ted Bundy research and all this darkness swirling in your head, do you have nightmares or do you sleep well at night?

Joe Berlinger: I actually don’t have that many nightmares, I’ve been doing this for so long. I have trouble sleeping in general — I sleep in two-hour bursts. I wish it was otherwise! But when I walk into my house I try to leave the work behind … which is not always successful.

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