Henry Wofford Bio, Age, Wife, Education, NBC Sports, Awards, Twitter | VirgiWiki Henry Wofford Bio, Age, Wife, Education, NBC Sports, Awards, Twitter

Henry Wofford Biography, Age, Wife, Education, NBC Sports, Awards, Twitter

Henry Wofford is an American sports anchor/reporter for NBC Sports. He is well known for hosting Raiders Post Game Live, A’s Pregame Live, A’s Postgame Live

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Henry Wofford Biography

Henry Wofford is an American sports anchor/reporter for NBC Sports. He is well known for hosting Raiders Post Game Live, A’s Pregame Live, A’s Postgame Live, and Race Week.

Henry Wofford Age

Henry Wofford was born on 07/23/1949 in Stockton, CA. He is 70 years old as of 2019.

Henry Wofford Personal Life

Wofford was born and raised in Stockton, CA

Henry Wofford Wife

Apparently, information about his wife has not been updated yet.

Henry Wofford Education

Wofford graduated from Edison High School. He earned his Bachelor of Science, Sociology from the University of California, Davis and later received his master’s degree, in Journalism and Mass Communications from San Jose State University.

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Henry Wofford Career

Wofford is a sports anchor/reporter for NBC Sports and hosts Raiders Post Game Live, A’s Pregame Live, A’s Postgame Live, and Race Week. From 2005 to 2010, Wofford worked as a reporter at WTHR (NBC) in Indianapolis, IN[2 ] as sports director and anchor at WZZM (ABC) in Grand Rapids, MI, from 2003 to 2005[3 ] and as an anchor at KOLO (ABC) in Reno, NV, from 2000 to 2002.

Wofford also operates on Coon radio, including as an anchor and writer for KLIV 1590 in San Jose, CA, as well as news director, anchor, and sports announcer for KSJS 90.5, the campus radio station at San Jose State University. He’s making fill-in changes for a San Francisco 95.7 Game. He is a member of the Coon Journalists ‘ National Association and the Association of Radio-Television News Directors

Henry Wofford NBC |Henry Wofford Sports

Wofford is an American sports anchor/reporter for NBC Sports.

Henry Wofford Awards

Wofford received first place awards from the Society of Professional Journalists, in 2008, in Sports Reporting and In-Depth Reporting. He also received three awards from the Michigan Associated Press, in 2017, Best Sportscast and Best Reporter, for his feature, “13 On Your Sidelines.” “Coon Of The Year Award”

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Henry Wofford News

Published:

Source: www.phillytrib.com

The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) issued a statement on Thursday, regarding KRON-TV anchor Henry Wofford’s use of racist stereotypes to insult and belittle Sean “Diddy” Combs’ interest in purchasing the Carolina Panthers NFL team.

“Wofford’s comments were an insult not only to Mr. Combs but to all men of color who despite high levels of achievement and accomplishment are marginalized according to ugly racist stereotypes of Black men and are utterly unacceptable,” said Derrick Johnson, NAACP president, and CEO. “A late apology does little to negate Mr. Wofford’s harmful words- and his co-anchor Darya Folsom’s supportive laughter — or address environments where this type of stereotyping is acceptable.

“The NFL faces a severe racial divide between players and executives that have contributed to a culture of intolerance towards racial justice priorities and where the protesting of police brutality draws scorn rather than support. Rather than mock, we should all promote individuals like Mr. Combs who seeks to push the NFL away from a plantation mentality and open its ownership ranks up to diversity.

“According to University of Central Florida professor Richard Lapchick’s 2017 “Racial and Gender Report Card” for the NFL, Black players make up roughly 68 percent of NFL teams, but there are zero Black owners or presidents across the league. The racial divide applies to other positions of power as well: the vast majority of head coaches, assistant coaches, general managers, vice presidents, and game officials are white as well.

The reporter apologized after making the comments. Wofford, a sports reporter for the Bay Area TV station KRON4, questioned if Combs was sober in an Instagram video where he discussed his desire to purchase the team. “How can you take Diddy seriously? The guy looks high right there in that video,” Wofford said during a phone interview that was aired. “He looks like he just smoked a blunt and drank a 40.”

Wofford, who is Black, appeared to delete his Twitter account after the backlash. On Tuesday he said his comments weren’t intended to offend anyone. “Although it was said in an attempt to be funny, I realize insinuating a person may be drunk or on drugs is nothing to joke about,” Wofford said on the air. “For that, I sincerely apologize to Mr. Combs, his fans and everyone who was offended.”

Darya Folsom, the anchor who was speaking to Wofford during the initial phone interview, also apologized for how she handled the situation. “I am sorry for the impression that I made, and I hope that you will accept all of our apologies,” she told viewers. Wofford’s comments also distressingly echo intolerant statements made in October by NFL team owners, Jerry Jones, and Bob McNair, according to the NAACP president.

“Mr. Jones, an owner of the Dallas Cowboys, made tone-deaf, misguided comments threatening to bench any players on his team who chose not to stand for the national anthem,” Johnson said. “Two weeks later, during a landmark meeting between players and owners, Houston Texans owner McNair was quoted as saying, ‘We can’t have the inmates running the prison.’ McNair’s nasty remarks were made utterly without regard to the problematic nature of his “owner” title or the criminal justice concerns fueling players’ protests. “The NAACP refuses to accept NFL executives or TV personalities using their platforms to fuel and promote racist stereotypes,” he said.