David Krumholtz Biography, Age, Wife, Height, Cancer, Movies, Sausage Party, Law And Order

David Krumholtz is an American actor best known for his appearence in the CBS drama series Numb3rs from 2005 to 2010, in the Harold & Kumar film trilogy and in the Santa Clause film franchise.

David Krumholtz Biography

David Krumholtz is an American actor best known for his appearence in the CBS drama series Numb3rs from 2005 to 2010, in the Harold & Kumar film trilogy and in the Santa Clause film franchise.

David Krumholtz Age / How Old Is David Krumholtz

David was born on 15 May 1978 in Queens, New York City, New York, United States. He is 40 years old as of
2018

David Krumholtz Family

He is the son of Michael and Judy Krumholtz. His paternal grandparents were migrants from Poland. His siblings are not known

David Krumholtz Wife

He is married to married actress Vanessa Britting. The couple married on May 22, 2010 at The Plaza Hotel, in New York City. They have two children; A daughter Pemma Mae Krumholtz, who was born in 2014, and a son, Jonas, born in 2016

How Tall Is David Krumholtz

He stands at the height of 1.68 meters

David Krumholtz Sausage Party

He was cast as Kareem Abdul Lavash, a Middle Eastern lavash who has an on and off rivalry with Sammy Bagel Jr in the 2016 American-Canadian adult computer-animated comedy film Sausage Party
David Krumholtz photo

David Krumholtz The Good Wife

He was cast as Josh Mariner in the 7 episodes of the American legal and political drama television series The Good Wife

David Krumholtz Santa Clause

He appeared as Bernard the Head Elf in the 1994 American Christmas fantasy family comedy film The Santa Clause and the 2002 American Christmas fantasy romantic mystery comedy film The Santa Clause 2

David Krumholtz Law And Order

He guest-starred on Law & Order and Law & Order: Special Victims Unit.

David Krumholtz Cancer / David Krumholtz Cancer Prognosis / David Krumholtz Thyroid Cancer

He was was diagnosed with thyroid cancer in July 2011, and began a radioactive iodine treatment five months later. He become cancer-free at the end of January 2012.

David Krumholtz Jewish

He was raised in a Jewish family

David Krumholtz The League

He guest stirred as Joel Cocque in the two episodes of the American sitcom The League

David Krumholtz Superbad

He was cast as as Benji Austin in the 2007 American coming-of-age teen comedy film SuperbadDavid Krumholtz The Deuce

David Krumholtz The Deuce

He was cast as Harvey Wasserman, a director of pornographic movies and Eileen Merrell’s mentor in the American drama television series

David Krumholtz This Is The End

He appeared as himself in the 2013 American comedy film This Is the End

David Krumholtz Addams Family

He starred as Joel Glicker, Wednesday’s love interest in the 1993 American comedy film Addams Family Values

David Krumholtz Net Worth

His net worth is estimated to be around $8 million

David Krumholtz Movies

Year

Title

Role

2018

A Futile and Stupid Gesture

Time-Life Publisher

The Ballad of Buster Scruggs

Frenchman in Saloon

2017

Wonder Wheel

Jake

2016

Hail, Caesar!

Communist screenwriter #4

Sausage Party

Kareem Abdul Lavash (voice)

Casual Encounters

Sammy Deetz

Ghost Team

Stan

2015

I Saw the Light

James Dolan

2014

The Judge

Mike Kattan

2013

Tuna

Getty

The Big Ask

Andrew

This Is the End

David Krumholtz

2011

Mr. Popper’s Penguins

Kent

A Very Harold & Kumar 3D Christmas

Goldstein

2009

I Love You, Man

Sydney’s buddy #3

2008

Demption

Detective Joseph Schneider

Harold & Kumar Escape from Guantanamo Bay

Goldstein

2007

Live!

Rex

Superbad

Benji Austin

Battle for Terra

Terrian Commander (voice)

Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story

Schwartzberg

2006

American Storage

Kurt

The Nail

Daniel

Bobby

Agent Phil

Tenacious D in The Pick of Destiny

Frat boy #2

2005

Guess Who

Jerry MacNamara

My Suicidal Sweetheart

Max

Serenity

Mr. Universe

2004

Looking for Kitty

Abe Fiannico

Harold & Kumar Go to White Castle

Goldstein

Ray

Milt Shaw

2003

Scorched

Max

Kill the Poor

Joe Peltz

2002

Big Shot: Confessions of a Campus Bookie

Benny Silman

You Stupid Man

Owen

The Santa Clause 2

Bernard the Arch-elf

Cheats

Evan Rosengarden

2001

The Mexican

Beck

Sidewalks of New York

Benjamin Bazler

Two Can Play That Game

Jason

According to Spencer

Ezra

2000

How to Kill Your Neighbor’s Dog

Brian Sellars

1999

10 Things I Hate About You

Michael Eckman

Liberty Heights

Yussel

1998

Slums of Beverly Hills

Ben Abromowitz

1997

The Ice Storm

Francis Davenport

1994

The Santa Clause

Bernard the Elf

1993

Life with Mikey

Barry Corman

Addams Family Values

Joel Glicker

David Krumholtz TV Shows

Year

Title

Role

2018

Living Biblically

Rabbi Gil Ableman

Star vs. the Forces of Evil

Cobalt Ferrero (voice)

Billions

Frotty Anisman

2017–present

The Deuce

Harvey Wasserman

2017

Difficult People

Ray

2016

The Interestings

Ethan Figman

2015

Forever

1984 Abe

Gigi Does It

Gigi

Comedy Bang! Bang!

Himself

Master of None

Nathan

2015–2016

Mom

Gregory Muchnick

2015–2017

All Hail King Julien

Timo / Additional voices

2014

Newsreaders

Mark Jones

Key & Peele

Terrorist #3

Men at Work

Myron

2014–2016

The Good Wife

Josh Mariner

2013–2014

The League

Joel Cocque

2012

Raising Hope

Carl

Don’t Trust the B—- in Apartment 23

Patrick Kelly

The Newsroom

Dr. Jacob “Jack” Habib

Partners

Joe Goodman

Childrens Hospital

Dookie

2011

The Playboy Club

Billy Rosen

2010

Law & Order: Special Victims Unit

Dr. Vincent Prochik

2007

Wainy Days

Ortez

2005–2010

Numb3rs

Charlie Eppes

2003

Lucky

Tony

The Lyon’s Den

Jeff Fineman

2001–2002

Undeclared

Greg

2000–2002

ER

Paul Sobriki

2000

The Trouble with Normal

Bob Wexler

Freaks and Geeks

Barry Schweiber

1998

The Closer

Bruno Verma

1997

Chicago Sons

Billy Kulchak

Justice League of America

Martin Walters

Union Square

Russell

1995

Pig Sty

Timmy

1994

Monty

David Richardson

1993

Law & Order

Scott Fisher

David Krumholtz Numbers

His contacts can not be found, you can still reach him through his social media accounts bellow:

David Krumholtz Twitter

David Krumholtz Instagram

https://www.instagram.com/p/Busa-h_gv-3/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link

Actor David Krumholtz Is Obsessed With His New Baby Boy

David Krumholtz Interview

Exclusive Interview with David Krumholtz about ‘The Big Ask’

Source: theultimaterabbit.com
Ben Kenber: The original title for “The Big Ask” was “Teddy Bears” which one character uses as a nickname for the cactus trees near the home everyone is staying in. Why did the title of the movie change?
David Krumholtz: I really don’t know why. I think Tribeca Films felt the title “Teddy Bears” didn’t really tell you what the film was. I like the title of “The Big Ask,” don’t get me wrong, but the problem is everywhere I go people ask me what I have coming out and I say “The Big Ask,” and they think I’m saying “The Big Ass.” So I keep getting, “You’re in a movie called ‘The Big Ass?’” And I have to explain that now it’s “Ask.” What’s even more awkward is that I show my ass in the movie.
BK: Well “The Big Ask” makes more sense in terms of what the movie is about.
DK: Yeah, I guess so.
BK: Yes, definitely. It’s like on the surface they are saying no but there’s a part of them that’s unconsciously considering it, so you can’t help but be riveted by the movie from start to finish for that reason.
DK: Yeah, the movie ends up becoming a reaffirmation of all the characters’ values. The one character of Dave (played by Zachary Knighton) wants to get married and he will stop at nothing to make it happen, and then the circumstance puts a stamp on his conviction to make it happen, to get his girlfriend to say yes. And the opposite is true for Jason Ritter’s character of Owen and Gillian (Jacobs) in that this brings to light the problems they have in their relationship, the communication issues. Their lives sort of unravel as a result of this question that this guy asks and it’s definitely not handled in a collegiate humor way. It’s definitely an adult movie for people who were not sure how to be adults. It’s certainly true of every adult.
BK: This movie is credited to two directors, Thomas Beatty and Rebecca Fishman. What was it like being directed by two directors instead of just one, and did that make things easier or harder?
DK: Well Thomas and Rebecca are husband and wife, and in this circumstance Thomas wrote the script so I think Thomas appreciated what Rebecca brought to it which was a filmic sense: the cinematography element and being in communication with the cameraman. So Thomas didn’t have to concentrate on anything but working with the actors and working on the script, so that in regard it was great. I found that I got more out of Thomas than I would have if he was worried about performance and camerawork the whole time. Rebecca had her own ideas as to what the film was tonally, and there were times when their ideas contradicted one another and there were times where we all agreed on the same thing. It’s tricky especially because they are husband and wife. You definitely don’t want to be the reason they start fighting, and it was a hard movie to make. But their spirit and their earnestness and their enthusiasm for the material really just carried us all through, so it was lovely to have the two of them there together.
BK: What was the most challenging aspect of playing this role for you?
DK: I mean for me, to be honest with you, I think beyond just doing some soul searching with the role, I think the most challenging thing is probably that there wasn’t very much that can be played broad or on the nose about this character. As actors we have an instinct to perform and to push and to show, and the hardest thing for me was I felt like the movie and Andrew only worked if I pulled him back and held back a lot because I’m playing a character that the audience is wondering what’s going on in his head. And more importantly, he’s wondering what’s going on in his head. He’s not even sure what he’s thinking, so it’s really important to pull back my performance and do something really small, and that was the biggest challenge for me. I need to establish a good level of trust with Thomas Beatty about that because I told him, “Look if I’m ever going too big or broad or if I’m too on the nose with my interpretation, pull me back. Let’s go smaller.” This is a movie where the awkward silences are the funniest beats, and so in this case less was more.
BK: The group dynamic between you and the rest of the actors is truly fantastic. Did you all have a lot of time to work things out and rehearse before you started shooting?
DK: No, this is a super low-budget indie so there are no frills and there’s not a lot of rehearsal time… Yeah, we did a couple of read-through and we kind of worked out some kinks. The great thing was from the first moment as a cast we all got along beautifully. We all enjoyed each other’s company, we all sort of came from similar places in our lives which we applied to this experience and to this project. So, what helped a lot and what made up for the lack of rehearsal time was that we all just had amazing chemistry as people, and then that did a lot of the work for us onscreen.