David Biggar Biography, Age, Wife, Career, NBC 4 News And Twitter | VirgiWiki David Biggar Biography, Age, Wife, Career, NBC 4 News And Twitter

David Biggar Biography, Age, Wife, Career, NBC 4 News And Twitter

David Biggar is an American journalist working as a meteorologist for NBC 4 News at 11 a.m. He is also on the weekend evening newscasts at 5 p.m. 6 p.m, and 11 p.m.

David Biggar Biography

David Biggar is an American journalist working as a meteorologist for NBC 4 News at 11 a.m. He is also on the weekend evening newscasts at 5 p.m. 6 p.m, and 11 p.m.

He was born in South Salem, New York and now currently living in Los Angeles. David attended the University of California at Davis. He graduated with a Bachelor’s degree in Atmospheric Science. David is also a Certified Broadcast Meteorologist.

Apart from being a journalist, David is also a licensed pilot and enjoys flying planes when he is not in the newsroom. He is also a big fan of racing, from NASCAR to Formula 1 and is a licensed racecar driver.

David Biggar Age

He was born in South Salem, New York. Information about his age will be updated soon.

David Biggar

David Biggar Wife

Information about his marital life will be updated soon.

David Biggar Career | David Biggar NBC 4 News

David is a meteorologist for NBC 4 News. He thrives on bringing the best news to his viewers using the latest technology and tools including augmented reality and the station’s mobile vehicles, the NBC4x4Caster, and StormRanger4.

He also researches and also prepared special weather reports including an in-depth presentation on the Orville Dam. Biggar reported for CNBC Global Headquarters in Englewood Cliffs, NJ, to deliver coverage of Hurricane Irma since joining NBC 4.

He is passionate about his career and this started from when he was young. He brings a natural enthusiasm for reporting weather conditions of Southern California. He has reported on events such as East Coast blizzards and has tracked tornadoes in Oklahoma.

David started his career as an intern working at KCRA situated in Sacramento. He quickly moved up the ranks and he became an anchor for the weekday noon news and weekend morning newscasts.

He won an Emmy award for anchoring KCRA’s weather. He also received industry recognition and was part of the NBC4 Weather Team that won a Los Angeles Emmy Award for the station’s special, “El Nino: Currents of Change” in 2015.

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KCRA says goodbye, good luck to David Biggar

 Article by David Biggar

Bright Rocket Contrails Light Up SoCal Sky After SpaceX Launch Tonight

Source; nbcnewyork.com

SpaceX will launch a Falcon 9 rocket on Sunday evening from Vandenberg Air Force Base, carrying an Argentinean satellite and marking the first time the Falcon 9 booster returns to land at Vandenberg AFB.

The Falcon 9 is a two-stage launch vehicle, meaning it is made up of two parts that carry the payload to orbit.

  • First Stage: The booster, or first stage, is what carries the payload for roughly the first 2 minutes and 40 seconds of the launch.
  • Second Stage: The second stage is what the payload is attached to. When the stages separate, the second stage carries the payload to orbit while the booster returns for landing.

The first stage for this launch is a recycled booster that flew the Iridium 7 launch in July. That booster landed on a drone ship in the Pacific. For Sunday’s launch, the booster will be landing back at Vandenberg AFB for the first time, on a newly constructed landing pad near the launch site.

Liftoff is currently scheduled for 7:21 p.m. Pacific Time on Sunday. Sunset at Vandenberg is 6:38 p.m. Pacific Time, so there is a chance we could see an illuminated contrail at the very end of the first stage’s burn and the start of the second stage’s burn.

Regardless of the illuminated contrail, SoCal residents may get to see something a bit different from the “traditional” Vandenberg launch: the return.

For the launch, look towards the west-northwest from the LA area and watch for a bright light that is rapidly climbing into the sky.

After the stages separate, we may see another light as the booster turns around and starts flying back towards Vandenberg AFB. This light will be flying in the opposite direction of the launch. Residents closer to Vandenberg may hear a sonic boom as the booster approaches.

SpaceX may again attempt to recover the payload fairings in a giant net attached to a boat. These fairings protect the satellite from the forces of the atmosphere during launch and are ejected after the stages separate.