Chris Hogan Bio, Age, Wife | Kids, Football and books

Chris Hogan Biography

Chris Hogan was signed by “New York Giants, and Miami Dolphins”, known as (San Francisco). Unfortunately, James did reach to final, where after 4 years he moved from Bills and entered into a three years contract with Patriots, making Super Bowl appearances in each season of the contract and helping the team win Super Bowl LI in 2017 and Super Bowl LIII in 2019. During the residence with the Dolphins, The American Footballer shined conspicuously on the 2012 season of HBO’s Hard Knocks after Reggie Bush nicknamed him (7-Eleven)reason being that he was “always open”.

Chris Hogan Age

James Hogan is an American football player who is widely known for being the receiver of the New England Patriots of the National Football League. He was born on 24/10/1988 in Wyckoff, NJ, as for 2018 he is 30 years old.

Chris Hogan Wife  | Chris Hogan Kids

Chris and Ashley dated for several years before tying the knot in 2017. The couple, who are the proud parents of 1.5-year-old boy-girl twins, will celebrate their two-year wedding anniversary in July. His wife is called Ashley whom they dated for long before they could which they did in the year 2017. The couples have two kids a son and daughter who are twins.

Chris Hogan Height

He is 4.6 feet tall.

Chris Hogan Eyes

The footballer’s eyes are very sharp, So expressive. He can expose a number of emotions to express through those two eyeballs that just have to know which pair matches your personality.

Chris Hogan Image

Chris Hogan Image
Chris Hogan Image

Chris Hogan College Football

He decided to attend Penn State college on scholarship to help build a rising Nittany Lions men’s lacrosse program. He started all 13 games as a freshman in 2007, scoring 11 goals, but appeared in just three games as a sophomore because of a high ankle sprain. In 2009, he had (29 goals on 133 shots) and was named first-team All-ECAC as well as voted captain for his senior season. He graduated in 2010 with one year of college sports eligibility remaining.

Chris Hogan Jersey

Chris Hogan jersey
Chris Hogan jersey

Chris Hogan Net Worth

As for 2018, he has net-worth of $3 million

Chris Hogan New England Patriots

On 10th March 2016 Hogan (a restricted free agent), signed a three-year offer sheet with the New England Patriots for ($12 million, with $7.5 million guaranteed). The contract was front-loaded ($5.5 million in 2016) to make it difficult for the Bills to match. This happened as Bill Belichick “head coach” saw major potential describing James as a “burner” with incredible active. Later the Bills decrease, to match the offer sheet, receiving no draft payment because of their original minimum salary one-year tender.

During a Week 1 matchup against the Arizona Cardinals on NBC Sunday Night Football, Hogan scored the first touchdown of the season for the Patriots on a 37-yard pass from quarterback Jimmy Garoppolo. In the Patriots’ Week 5 matchup against the Cleveland Browns, Hogan had a career-high of ‘114’ receiving yards, this time with Tom Brady as his quarterback. while playing against his former team in Buffalo, he caught four passes for ’91’ yards, including a then career-long 53-yard touchdown reception. In Week 12, against the New York Jets, Hogan became the third Patriots wide receiver in as many seasons to attempt a pass; while Hogan’s left-handed pass was incomplete, it drew a 31-yard defensive pass interference penalty. He also passed his past career-best for receiving yards in a season with 461 yards on 21 receptions (20.1 yards per catch, then trailing only injured teammate Rob Gronkowski for the NFL lead at 21.6). In Week 14, on Monday Night Football, he caught a 79-yard touchdown pass against the Baltimore Ravens, the longest of his career (and the seventh longest in the NFL) part of another career-best 129 yards on five receptions. He ended the season with 38 receptions for 680 yards and 4 touchdowns; his 17.89 yards per catch was second only to DeSean Jackson’s 17.95. In the postseason, Hogan had 4 receptions for 95 yards in a win over Houston, followed by nine receptions for 180 yards and two touchdowns in the AFC Championship win over Pittsburgh. These were career highs in all three categories and a Patriots playoff record for receiving yards in a single game.[24] On February 5, 2017, Hogan was part of the Patriots team that won Super Bowl LI. In the game, he had four receptions for 57 yards as the Patriots defeated the Atlanta Falcons by a score of (34to28) in overtime.

Chris Hogan Actor | Chris Hogan Author

Hogan is also an actor and writer, he becomes known for 39 to Go (2014), Hollywood Adventure and The Corridor Defend.

Chris Hogan Nfl

  1. NFL Transactions Tracker Feb 5
  2. FMIA: Super Bowl 53 Feb 4
  3. Super Bowl Player Rankings Feb 3
  4. Super Bowl 53 Matchups Feb 3
  5. Super Bowl Injury Report Feb 3
  6. Super Bowl Player Props Feb 1
  7. Podcast: SB53 Betting Guide Feb 1
    NFL Futures Deals Tracker Feb 1

Chris Hogan and  Lacrosse

Chris took four seasons off from football but he never really stopped playing the game during his time as a lacrosse player in State College.
He certainly played lacrosse like a football player,’’ Glenn Thiel (Nittany Lions coach) remembered former “He was very physical and he was such an athlete. Physically, he could just overwhelm lacrosse players.’’

Coming off a stellar career at Ramapo (N.J.) High, where the future Patriots receiver was a first-team All-New Jersey performer as a junior and senior in lacrosse and an all-state first teamer as a senior in football,he had a decision to make.

With offers rolling in to play Division 1 lacrosse (from perennial powerhouse programs Syracuse and Virginia, among others) and Division 1 football (including Rutgers and UConn), it wasn’t an easy decision.

“It was tough,’’ Hogan said last week after wrapping up his OTA duties in Foxborough. “I loved playing both sports. When it came down to it, I felt Penn State was an amazing school. I loved the campus. And it was an opportunity to help build a rising [lacrosse] program. It was tough, but I’ve never regretted my decision at all.’

’No regrets, but Hogan never really lost the football bug. Living in the shadow of Mount Nittany, reminders were everywhere. It was a difficult adjustment to not strap on the helmet and shoulder pads (at least the football kind) when he arrived.

Actually, I struggled even going to the games because I felt like I should be out there playing,’’ he said. “It was a rough first fall for me.’’

Still, he went about the business of being a lacrosse player — a dominant one according to Thiel, who acknowledged it was a bit of a coup to land an athlete of Hogan’s caliber.

“Obviously he was a great athlete,’’ said Thiel. “But his size set him apart. He was 6-2, 6-3, 215 pounds — we just didn’t see that on the lacrosse field, very seldom. There are some guys playing now that size but he was unique then.’’

The Player was such a presence on the field that he often intimidated opponents before the opening faceoff.

“Just putting him on the field, the other team had something to worry about,’’ said Thiel, who retired in 2012 after 33 years leading the Nittany Lions. “Then on top of that, he was a good lacrosse player. I mean, big, strong, fast, could get his shot off. He was unique.’’

Hogan started all 13 games as a freshman in 2007 and scored 11 goals. He played just three games as a sophomore because of a high ankle sprain — a turn that would prove fortuitous as Hogan was granted a redshirt season.

He came back with a vengeance in 2009, collecting a team-high 29 goals and 133 shots. Showing his patented physical play, he also led the Nittany Lions with 10 penalties.

For his efforts, he was named first-team All-ECAC and chosen a captain for his senior season. Hogan also proved to be the poster boy for the program.

“Younger kids coming in saw the product that he was — the size, the speed, the strength — and they would try to emulate that,’’ said Thiel. “He was somebody people wanted to mold themselves after.’’

Though Hogan’s numbers dipped his senior season (15 goals, 24 points), there was a good reason.

“We switched him to defensive midfield because we wanted to get more out of the transition from defense to offense,’’ said Thiel. “He would get us running so we could create offense instantly . . . So he really did everything for us over the three full seasons.’’

Hogan in action for the Penn State lacrosse team. (Mark Selders and Penn State University)

Scratching that itch

It was the first of several transitions for Hogan, who was set to graduate but still had a year of college eligibility because of that ankle injury. It was time to scratch that football itch that had never left.

“It was something that was definitely in the back of my mind always,’’ said Hogan, who believes all the cutting he did in lacrosse has helped him get in and out of his breaks on pass routes. “I always thought that I could play football at the college level . . . I thought about it constantly.’’

After exploring his options and talking with former high school rivals Kenny Amsel and Nick Romeo, who were enrolled at Monmouth, Hogan met with Hawks coach Kevin Callahan, who had recruited him in high school.

“I sat down with him when he came to campus and just loved everything about him,’’ said Callahan. “We knew he hadn’t played in four years but we weren’t overly concerned about that.’’

Much the way he made an instant impact in State College, Pa., he did the same in West Long Branch, N.J. There was no evidence of rust.

From his first workout with the Hawks, Hogan stood out, according to Callahan. The coach said he normally would hesitate to bring a player in for just one season, but it was clear this was no normal case.

Hogan then played one season of football in 2010 at Monmouth University.

After he played one season of football in 2010 at Monmouth University.

“He’s not a guy you had to watch practice 10 times to figure out he was special,’’ said Callahan. “We saw him run a route and we said, ‘Wow, we really have something here.’ ’’

He quickly picked up the playbook and secured a spot as a receiver, but his role would soon expand. After three games and several injuries, Callahan found himself thin in the secondary. After scanning his roster, Callahan found a solution — the new guy.

“I approached him and he said, ‘I can do that,’ ’’ said Callahan, who thinks the four years away from the pounding of football may have prolonged Hogan’s career. “So we kind of gave him what he needed to know, didn’t overcoach him an awful lot, to be honest, just enough so that he’d be playing within the scheme, and he was a starting corner the rest of the season.’’

Again, Hogan paid immediate dividends. In his first game at cornerback, he picked off a pair of passes in a win over Duquesne. He also added a 41-yard catch.

For nine games Hogan played full time on defense, about 15-20 plays on offense, and on all the special team’s units. He may have played only one season, but he packed plenty into it.

“Chris has great instincts, and most of all he’s a very dependable, reliable athlete,’’ said Callahan. “Meaning, if you tell him part of a play or a play design or pass concept and you tell him he has to be in a certain place at a certain time, he’s going to be there. He’s going to find a way to get there.’’

Hogan finished the season with 28 tackles and three interceptions, 12 catches for 147 yards, three TDs, and dreams of continuing his football career.

“My agent [Arthur Weiss] didn’t sugarcoat it at all, he told me it would be a tough road,’’ he said. “But I didn’t want to regret not trying it.’’

He carried the ball during a (2010) game against Bryant. He had 12 catches for 147 yards in his season at Monmouth, and also had 28 tackles on defense.

“It was tough,’’ Hogan said last week after wrapping up his OTA duties in Foxborough. “I loved playing both sports. When it came down to it, I felt Penn State was an amazing school. I loved the campus. And it was an opportunity to help build a rising [lacrosse] program. It was tough, but I’ve never regretted my decision at all.’’

No regrets, but Hogan never really lost the football bug. Living in the shadow of Mount Nittany, reminders were everywhere. It was a difficult adjustment to not strap on the helmet and shoulder pads (at least the football kind) when he arrived.

“Actually, I struggled even going to the games because I felt like I should be out there playing,’’ he said. “It was a rough first fall for me.’’

Still, he went about the business of being a lacrosse player — a dominant one according to Thiel, who acknowledged it was a bit of a coup to land an athlete of Hogan’s caliber.

“Obviously he was a great athlete,’’ said Thiel. “But his size set him apart. He was 6-2, 6-3, 215 pounds — we just didn’t see that on the lacrosse field, very seldom. There are some guys playing now that size but he was unique then.’’

Hogan was such a presence on the field that he often intimidated opponents before the opening faceoff.

“Just putting him on the field, the other team had something to worry about,’’ said Thiel, who retired in 2012 after 33 years leading the Nittany Lions. “Then on top of that, he was a good lacrosse player. I mean, big, strong, fast, could get his shot off. He was unique.’’

Hogan started all 13 games as a freshman in 2007 and scored 11 goals. He played just three games as a sophomore because of a high ankle sprain — a turn that would prove fortuitous as Hogan was granted a redshirt season.

Hogan came back with a vengeance in 2009, collecting a team-high 29 goals and 133 shots. Showing his patented physical play, he also led the Nittany Lions with 10 penalties.

For his efforts, he was named first-team All-ECAC and chosen a captain for his senior season. Hogan also proved to be the poster boy for the program.

“Younger kids coming in saw the product that he was — the size, the speed, the strength — and they would try to emulate that,’’ said Thiel. “He was somebody people wanted to mold themselves after.’’

Though Hogan’s numbers dipped his senior season (15 goals, 24 points), there was a good reason.

“We switched him to defensive midfield because we wanted to get more out of the transition from defense to offense,’’ said Thiel. “He would get us running so we could create offense instantly  So he really did everything for us over the three full seasons.’’

Chris Hogan in action for the Penn State lacrosse team. (Mark Selders/Penn State University)

Scratching that itch

It was the first of several transitions for Hogan, who was set to graduate but still had a year of college eligibility because of that ankle injury. It was time to scratch that football itch that had never left.

Chris Hogan Dave Ramsey

Chris Hogan Podcast

Chris Hogan Penn State

Year

Team

GP

GS

Receiving

Rushing

Fumbles

Rec

Yds

Avg

Lng

TD

Att

Yds

Avg

Lng

TD

Fum

Lost

2013

BUF

16

0

10

83

8.3

16

0

0

0

2014

BUF

16

2

41

426

10.4

31

4

2

2

2015

BUF

16

4

36

450

12.5

46

2

1

4

4.0

4

0

0

0

2016

NE

15

14

38

680

17.9

79T

4

3

9

3.0

6

0

1

1

2017

NE

9

7

34

439

12.9

47T

5

3

17

5.7

13

0

0

0

2018

NE

16

7

35

532

15.2

63T

3

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total

88

34

194

2,610

13.5

79

18

7

30

4.3

13

0

3

3

Postseason[edit]

Year

Team

GP

GS

Receiving

Rushing

Fumbles

Rec

Yds

Avg

Lng

TD

Att

Yds

Avg

Lng

TD

Fum

Lost

2016

NE

3

3

17

332

19.5

45

2

0

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

2017

NE

3

2

9

152

16.9

43

2

1

4

4.0

4

0

0

0

Total

6

5

26

484

18.6

45

4

1

4

4.0

4

0

0

0

Chris Hogan Twitter

Chris Hogan News

Chris caught(0-of-6) targets in the Patriots’ Super Bowl victory over the Rams.
Hogan bounced back from an injury-marred 2017 to appear in all 16 games, but he disappointingly caught just 35 passes. 12 from across two games, including the Pats’ Josh Gordon-less Week 17. Hogan’s reception total was extra disappointing when you consider the undermanned nature of Tom Brady’s receiver corps. Now on the wrong side of 30, Hogan is headed to the open market. He will need to be amenable to Bill Belichick’s surely-bargain price if he wants to return to New England.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

error: Content is protected !!