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Barbara Bailey Biography, Age, WKTV, And Networth

Barbara Bailey Biography

Barbara Bailey Is An American a reporter, producer and anchor at the CBS affiliate ever since. She currently co-anchors WKYT Midmorning (at 10am) and WKYT News at Noon.

She is a native of Harlan, Kentucky, and a graduate of Harlan High School and the University of Kentucky. While attending graduate school at the University of Kentucky, she was also a teaching assistant there. Prior to her work in television, Barbara was a general assignment reporter for The Harlan Daily Enterprise and also taught journalism at Asbury College.

In 1979, she began her career at WKYT-TV.

She has been an active community volunteer serving on many community boards, including the Ronald McDonald House, Center for Women, Children and Families, Big Brothers/ Big Sisters of the Bluegrass, Big Brothers/ Big Sisters of America, Kidney Foundation of Central Kentucky, Leadership Lexington, special appointment to the Chamber of Commerce, Bluegrass Tomorrow, Junior League of Lexington, Kentucky Humanities Council, American Heart Association, Alzheimer’s Association, Chi Omega Advisory Board and St. Agnes House.

Barbara is married to Roger Cowden. They have two children, Courtney Cowden Woomer and Clark Cowden, and granddaughters Callie and Caroline Woomer.

Barbara Bailey (Anchor) Age

Her Exact Date of Birth is still Under Investigation We will Update When Information Is Available.

Barbara Bailey (Anchor) Image

Barbara Bailey (Anchor)

Barbara Bailey (Anchor)WKTV

She currently co-anchors WKYT Midmorning (at 10am) and WKYT News at Noon.WKTV is an NBC/CBS/CW+-affiliated television station licensed to Utica, New York, United States and serving Central Upstate New York’s Mohawk Valley. It broadcasts a 720p high-definition television (HD) digital signal (downconverted from the networks’ native 1080i resolutions) on ultra high frequency (UHF) channel 29, or virtual channel 2 via Program and System Information Protocol (PSIP), from a transmitter in the Eatonville section of Fairfield. Owned by Heartland Media, it has studios on Smith Hill Road in Deerfield (with a Utica postal address).

On cable, the station’s NBC-affiliated primary channel can be seen on Charter Spectrum channel 4 and in full high definition on channel 1203.The station launched on December 1, 1949, as Utica’s first television station, operating on Very high frequency (VHF) channel 13. It was the 93rd television station in the United States to sign-on. This made Utica one of the smallest cities in the nation with a television station. It was owned by Copper City Broadcasting Corporation, controlled by Myron Kallet, along with WKAL (1450 AM). As the only station in its area, it was affiliated with all four major networks at the time: NBC,DuMont, ABC, and CBS, with NBC being its primary affiliation. It lost DuMont in 1956 following the network’s closure, and lost CBS soon afterward following a dispute with the network; after that, WHEN-TV/WTVH in Syracuse served as the default CBS affiliate for the Utica area until 2015.

In 1951, a young local radio announcer named Dick Clark joined the staff at WKTV. He quickly gathered a loyal following. Clark’s father was the manager of Utica radio station WRUN (1150 AM, later to become WUTI and shut down in 2013; and 104.3 FM, now WFRG-FM), and his son wanted to avoid the name recognition factor. To avoid confusion, the younger Clark became known on-air as “Dick Clay”. Eventually, Clark would anchor the weeknight newscasts on WKTV (replacing Robert Earle, who would later host the GE College Bowl). In 1952, Clark departed WKTV for WFIL AM-FM-TV in Philadelphia.

In 1958, Kallet sold WKTV and WKAL to a group led by Paul Harron and Gordon Gray, who had previously owned WIBG AM-FM in Philadelphia and WPFH in Wilmington, Delaware.Soon afterward, on January 1, 1959, WKTV moved to VHF channel 2 in a dial realignment, which allowed WTRI (channel 35) in Albany to move to channel 13 (where it became WAST, now WNYT), and (along with the earlier move of a channel 13 allocation in Hamilton, Ontario to channel 11, becoming CHCH-TV) led to a channel 13 allocation being assigned to Rochester (which signed on in 1962 as WOKR and is now WHAM-TV). With the switch, WKTV upgraded its signal and began to cover a fairly wide area stretching from as far south as the Catskill Mountains, as far east as The Berkshires in Western Massachusetts and into Southern Ontario, Canada. The Harron/Gray group, Mid-New York Broadcasting, sold WKAL in 1961, but retained WKTV, and in subsequent years acquired several additional stations, including KAUZ-TV in Wichita Falls, Texas, and WMTW-FM-TV on Mount Washington, New Hampshire.Harron also operated a chain of cable systems in the Northeastern United States, including a system in Utica, Central New York Cable TV (Later, Harron Cable TV) built in 1963.[9][10] The company eventually became known as Harron Communications Corporation.

WKTV enjoyed a monopoly in the Utica television market until February 28, 1970, when WUTR signed on as an ABC affiliate. WKTV then became affiliated solely with NBC, and is now one of the network’s longest-serving affiliates. In the mid-1980s, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) ruled on cross-ownership of broadcast, cable and print media in the same market. The FCC grandfathered Harron. A few years later Harron acquired the nearby Canajoharie, New York, cable system, then owned by a local appliance dealer. The Canajoharie plant extended well within a 20-mile (32 km) contour of WKTV’s Middleville, New York, transmitter site. The FCC revoked Harron’s grandfather status and required divestiture of either its cable or television assets in the region. In 1992, Harron sold controlling interest in WKTV to Smith Broadcasting (the cable system was later sold to Adelphia and is now part of Charter Communications). In 2004, Boston Ventures, acquired the Smith Broadcasting stations, and formed Smith Media, LLC, after founder Bob Smith died in 2003.