Ariane Aramburo Biography, Age, Education, KTUU, Twitter, News

Ariane Aramburo is an American Morning Edition Anchor/Executive Producer. She joined KTUU in June 2014 as the Executive Producer and co-anchor of “The

Ariane Aramburo Biography

Ariane Aramburo is an American Morning Edition Anchor/Executive Producer. She joined KTUU in June 2014 as the Executive Producer and co-anchor of “The Morning Edition.”She is seen on weekday mornings from 5:00 to 7:00 a.m. with Meteorologist Howie Gordon. Ariane is a Top 40 Under 40 recipient and two-time Emmy nominated journalist.

Ariane Aramburo Age

Aramburo is 37 years old, though information about her date of birth has not yet been revealed. She grew up in Eagle River

Ariane Aramburo Education

The news anchor is a graduate of Chugiak High School, She holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Mass Communications with a concentration in Broadcast Journalism.

Ariane Aramburo
 Ariane Aramburo

Ariane Aramburo Career

Aramburo joined KTUU in June 2014 as the Executive Producer and co-anchor of “The Morning Edition.” You can catch her weekday mornings from 5:00 to 7:00 a.m. with Meteorologist Howie Gordon.

In October 2016, Ariane traveled to the Postpartum Progress Warrior Mom Conference in Atlanta to serve as a keynote speaker on the topic of Postpartum Depression. She was also named the 2016 Alaska Broadcaster of the Year by the Alaska Broadcasters Association. Ariane is a Top 40 Under 40 recipient and two-time Emmy nominated journalist. She enjoys working out, cooking, traveling and lives in Anchorage with her family.

Ariane Aramburo KTUU

Aramburo is an American Morning Edition Anchor/Executive Producer at KTUU-TV.

Aramburo Twitter

Aramburo News

Published: Tue 8:29 AM, Feb 13, 2018

Source: www.ktuu.com

ANCHORAGE (KTUU) – October is breast cancer awareness month, which means you’ll see a sea of pink, participate in the walks, but it also means getting screened.

In this week’s 2 Your Health, I, Ariane Aramburo, took viewers through the process of what it was like getting my very first mammogram. Dressed in a robe and scrubs, Imaging Associates Mammography Technologist, Jenny Tibbetts greeted me behind a curtain. Tibbetts asked a series of health-related questions before starting the screening, which takes four images and two different views of the breasts.

Afterward, Tibbetts directed me to see Dr. Heather Tauschek, Director of Women’s Imaging for a reading of those results. We sat in a dark room as Tauschek looked over images and explained the complexity of breast imaging. “The things that we’re looking for are calcification which can show up like little speckles of sand, we’re looking for masses and we’re also looking for areas of distortion,” said Tauschek. She explained sometimes things can be masked because of breast density and things can hide, so when looking at 3D imaging, it allows for a clearer view to see things that might not otherwise show up on 2D images.

It’s an Olympic sport that uses a broom and a rock. Sounds pretty straight forward, right? Curling, however, has evolved into a popular modern sport and is described as the “roaring game” because of the loud sound the 44-pound rock makes when sliding across the ice. John Seigle of the Anchorage Curling Club said it’s a semi-ancient sport that’s been around for quite a while. It started in Scotland when people would go out on frozen lakes and find the most polished stones and slide them across the ice.

“It has some similarities to shuffleboard in that it has a bullseye, but it’s far more difficult than that,” said Seigle. The Anchorage Curling Club is a non-profit social and recreation club that promotes the sport of curling. They were kind enough to give Channel 2’s Ariane Aramburo a lesson in curling and she said it was a lot harder than it looked. “It was a lot of fun. I thought the sweeping would be the easiest part. Boy was I wrong,” said Aramburo.