Angelica Duria Biography, Age, Husband, Hair color, Articles, FOX6,Career. | VirgiWiki Angelica Duria Biography, Age, Husband, Hair color, Articles, FOX6,Career.

Angelica Duria Biography, Age, Husband, Hair color, Articles, FOX6, CBS, and Career.

Angelica Duria is an American journalist. She is the FOX6 Wakeup anchor/reporter who joined FOX6 News team in October 2010. Since her arrival, Angelica has controlled many roles and shifts on FOX6. For over 2 years, she reported for FOX6 Wakeup, covering a number of Wisconsin’s biggest news stories — the blizzard of 2011, the Packers’ road to the Superbowl, the Sikh Temple shooting, and many of political coverage.

Angelica Duria Biography

Angelica Duria is an American journalist. She is the FOX6 Wakeup anchor/reporter who joined FOX6 News team in October 2010. Since her arrival, Angelica has controlled many roles and shifts on FOX6. For over 2 years, she reported for FOX6 Wakeup, covering a number of Wisconsin’s biggest news stories — the blizzard of 2011, the Packers’ road to the Superbowl, the Sikh Temple shooting, and many of political coverage.

Angelica Duria Age

Duria was born in Chicago and raised in the western suburb of Elmwood Park but her age and birthday have not been disclosed.

Angelica Duria Husband

She was engaged in December 2010 and tied the knot with her husband later on. Angelica is a happily married woman although not much details about her husband are known to the public.

Angelica Duria Hair color

Dark Brown color.

Angelica Duria Background and education

Angelica was born in Chicago and raised in the western suburb of Elmwood Park. She attended the University of Illinois, where she graduated with a Cum Laude at Urbana-Campaign in 2008 with a Bachelor’s of Science degree in Broadcast Journalism. Angelica won two student awards (Hearst Journalism & Illinois News Broadcasters Association) through her internship work at CBS News in Washington D.C.

Angelica Duria Career

Angelica Duria joined the FOX6 Newsgroup in October 2010, making her trek back home to the Midwest.

Since her entry, Angelica has held a few jobs and moves on FOX6. For over two years, she revealed for FOX6 Wakeup, covering a portion of Wisconsin’s greatest news stories — the snowstorm of 2011, the Packers’ street to the Superbowl, the Sikh Temple shooting, and a lot of political inclusion. Investing a long time in Madison covering challenges over aggregate bartering and detailing live from a few battles stops for the gubernatorial review and Presidential decisions in 2012.

Be that as it may, it was the winter of 2013 that may have been the most vital. Angelica was covering a snowstorm when her “It’s snowing and it sucks here” report turned into a web sensation. CNN’s Jeanne Moos even committed an entire story to her!

Angelica Duria

From that point forward, Angelica has advanced into the studio as a component of the FOX6 Wakeup grapple group and Real Milwaukee host board. As a self-depicted foodie, she began a fortnightly cooking section on Real Milwaukee called “Feasting with Duria.” You can get her on FOX6 each weekday from 4:30-10 a.m.

Prior to coming to Wisconsin, Angelica worked in Northwest Arkansas for KHBS/KHOG 40/29 News. There, she filled in as a columnist covering ice storms, tornadoes and the world’s biggest retailer – Walmart.

As a first generation Filipino-American, Angelica is a proud member of the Asian American Journalists Association.

Angelica loves calling Milwaukee home, but unfortunately, her sports loyalty lies in Chicago. She loves cheering on her “home” teams – da Bears, Cubs, Blackhawks, Bulls and of course, her “Fighting Illini” alma mater!

In her spare time, Angelica likes to travel, spend time with family, find new places to eat and shop for bargains. So much so, that she’s admitted to owning over 90 pairs of shoes!

Angelica Duria Articles

Save the bugs

MILWAUKEE — They may bug you, but insects are dying off and nature experts say that’s not a good thing. A college professor and her students are trying to give bugs life through art.

They crawl, they fly, they buzz and they may creep you out, but the small bugs serve a big purpose.

“They make soil, they pollinate the plants, they feed a lot of other animals,” said Lakeshore State Park Manager, Tom Kroeger.

If you look around, they’re hard to find.

“If you take them out, if they were to leave, the whole system would fall apart and we’re starting to see some of those problems,” said Kroeger.

According to the Department of Natural Resources, the insect population has declined 40 percent over the last 30 years. In some suburban areas here, 90 percent of bugs have died off.

“A reason I think a lot of that is happening is everyone is using lawn services, and a lot of times they put insecticides in those lawn services. They don’t want the beetles, they don’t want the ants, but you lose everything else with that,” said Kroeger.

Without the proper habitat, the basis of the food chain could essentially be wiped away.

“We found the statistics and they were startling,” said University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Lecturer, Kathryn Martin-Meurer.

Which led UWM Lecturer, Kathryn Martin-Meurer, to come up with an art project. Last year, she decided to put her 3-D art concepts call to the task of building insect models.

Perfect fit

Parents are hand-selecting traits they want their future children to have. It is all part of the process when using a donor.

Courtney Belz’s twins have blonde hair, blue eyes and the twins are everything that one couple could have asked for.

“I really looked for physical characteristics similar to me because we weren’t always sure how open we would be. But I wanted my children to still look similar to me,” said Belz.

And they do. Many would never know Belz and her husband Jason used an egg donor to conceive their boy-girl twins Brooks and Hensley. The couple made the decision after learning Courtney would not be able to achieve pregnancy using her own eggs — and in-vitro fertilization failed.

“She said ‘it’s probably your eggs.’ And when I went home, I really heard those words and it was really devastating,” Belz said.

When it comes to choosing an egg donor, couples can get down to the nitty-gritty.

“Are they calm? Are they rambunctious? Are they kind of an introvert or an extrovert?” said Nichole Hayes, who is with the non-profit, Kansas City Infertility Awareness.

So where do parents go to search for a “perfect fit” donor? Online.

Here’s how it works. On a donor bank website, if your preference is Asian and also a Christian, there is a list of options. The results even show if the donor is an experienced donor or not — meaning their eggs have been successful at producing a baby. Dr. Ryan Riggs with Blue Sky Fertility says families have a lot to consider.

“People look for donors who have similar physical characteristics to them. They look at the health history and family history of the donor — and they also look at the successor track record of the donor,” Dr. Riggs said.

Belz, a mother of 22-month-old twins, knew she wanted her kids to look like her — and it was more than her donor’s blonde hair and blue eyes that had her interested.

“The character questions is kind of what it came down to for me. I just liked the responses of one a little bit more than the other one,” Belz said.

Belz and her husband narrowed their donors down to three different women — all with the physical features they wanted. They felt a special connection with one of them.

“She was asked why she was an egg donor — and she herself had two children, and she said, in so many words, that she wanted for someone who is struggling to have children to be able to have the same happiness that she had being a mother,” Belz said.

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