Al Jardine Biography, Age, Height, Family, Net Worth and News

Al Jardine ( born Alan Charles Jardine) is an American musician, singer, and songwriter who co-founded the Beach Boys. He is best known as the band’s

 

Al Jardine Biography

Al Jardine ( born Alan Charles Jardine) is an American musician, singer, and songwriter who co-founded the Beach Boys. He is best known as the band’s

rhythm guitarist and for occasionally singing lead vocals on songs such as “Help Me, Rhonda” (1965), “Then I Kissed Her” (1965), and “Come Go with Me” (1978). He has released one solo studio album, A Postcard from California (2010). In 1988, Jardine was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as a member of the Beach Boys.

Al Jardine Age

Al Jardine an American musician, singer, and songwriter who co-founded the Beach Boys was born on  September 3, 1942.

Al Jardine Height

Alan an American musician, singer, and songwriter who co-founded the Beach Boy has a standing height of  5 feet 5 inches tall.

Al Jardine Family

Alan Charles Jardine was born in Lima, Ohio, but his family moved to Rochester, New York, where his father worked for Eastman Kodak and taught at the Rochester Institute of Technology. His family later moved to San Francisco and then to Hawthorne, California. At Hawthorne High School, he befriended fellow football player Brian Wilson and watched Brian and brother Carl Wilson singing at a school assembly. After attending Ferris State University during the 1960-61 academic year, Jardine registered as a student at El Camino College in 1961.

Al Jardine Education

In Hawthorne High School, he befriended fellow football player Brian Wilson and watched Brian and brother Carl Wilson singing at a school assembly. After attending Ferris State University during the 1960-61 academic year, Jardine registered as a student at El Camino College in 1961.

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Al Jardine Image

Al Jardine Career

Jardine played bass on the Beach Boys’ first (and only) record for Candix Records. Although he left in 1961 to pursue a career in dentistry, Jardine filled in on bass for Brian during concerts and returned full-time in 1963 following David Marks’ departure after an argument with Murry Wilson. Jardine is the band’s rhythm guitarist and middle-range harmony vocalist. He first sang lead on “Christmas Day,” on 1964’s The Beach Boys’ Christmas Album and followed shortly after with the Number 1 hit “Help Me, Rhonda”.

Beginning with his contributions to the Friends album, Jardine wrote or co-wrote a number of songs for the Beach Boys. “California Saga: California” from the Holland album, charted in early 1973. Jardine’s song for his first wife, “Lady Lynda” (1978), scored a Top Ten chart entry in the UK. Increasingly from the time of the Surf’s Up album, Al became involved alongside Carl Wilson in production duties for the Beach Boys. He shared production credits with Ron Altbach on M.I.U. Album (1978) and was a significant architect (with Mike Love) of the album’s concept and content. As with “Lady Lynda” and his 1969 rewrite of Lead Belly’s “Cotton Fields,” “Come Go with Me” and “Peggy Sue” on the M.I.U. Album were Jardine productions, the first being a measurable hit in the UK.

Al Jardine Net Worth

How much is Al Jardine Worth? Al Jardine net worth: Al Jardine is an American musician who has a net worth of $40 million dollars.

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Al Jardine Remembers Hal Blaine’s Work With the Beach Boys: ‘We Got Lucky’

Legendary session drummer played on “Help Me Rhonda,” “California Girls,” “Good Vibrations,” “I Get Around” and many more

Hal Blaine and Al Jardine

Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

When you think of the classic incarnation of the Beach Boys, it’s easy to recall Dennis Wilson holding down the drum kit. In fact, the man supplying the beats for many of their enduring mid-1960s recordings was Hal Blaine, the legendary Los Angeles-based session drummer and member of the Wrecking Crew studio group, who died on March 11th at age 90.

Blaine’s resume — some of the most well-known records made by Frank Sinatra, Simon and Garfunkel, the Mamas and the Papas and the Fifth Dimension; many Phil Spector productions; even the Partridge Family — could fill a Rock & Roll Hall of Fame exhibit. He also played on enough Beach Boys classics to fill one of their hits packages: “Help Me Rhonda,” “California Girls,” “Good Vibrations,” “I Get Around,” “Darlin’,” and later albums like 15 Big Ones. In this new conversation with RS, founding Beach Boy Al Jardine recalls Blaine’s contributions to the band.

Hal played on so many important historical recordings. He was the glue that held them together — that Sinatra stuff, whew. I can’t remember the first time we used him on Beach Boys records, but Brian might have started using him after the “Surf City” session. [Ed. Note: Wilson co-wrote the chart-topping 1963 hit for Jan & Dean.] Hal and Earl Palmer played double drums on that, and that impressed Brian a lot.

We worked feverishly on the first few albums, but at one point the Wrecking Crew came in, because we were on the road so much.  We would come home and do the vocals, but the Crew would be tracking. Brian wasn’t in the touring band, so he got to play with those guys. I remember coming into the studio one day and hearing one of the songs on [1965’s] Summer Days (and Summer Nights). I remember thinking, “Wow, what a great drum track — amazing!”

There’s a lot of pressure in the studio. We had three-hour sessions, and we’d try to do three songs in three hours. You had to have your shit together. Hal was the session leader, and he had this calming effect. He had those intense, friendly blue eyes of his. He was very engaging and always interested in what you were doing. He told a lot of funny jokes. He would calm your nerves when you had an idea.

Brian and I would have a great idea, but you had to put it all together and organize it. It was a huge deal. We were chord guys, but when you’re talking to a trumpet player or reed player, you need a translator.  Hal produced the guys in the chairs. He made sure all the charts were legible. He’d hand them out like he was the teacher. Hal was the producer of the producers. Brian idolized him.